When do you know it’s “time”?

I cannot make a blanket statement and claim that everyone has been at “this” particular place that I was at, a few days ago – This is a place where you question your professional standing, if this is what you want, and what exactly do you want. Soon after I got married, I started falling in love with the “homely” life I had looked down at for my entire life. I wanted to be home, cook for N, look pretty at all times and be in the bed for at least 14 hours (sleeping, obviously).

Anyway, changing priorities had me distracted from work. And I finally said aloud (to N), “I am going to resign”. He looked at me… (No, you have to wait, he’s still intently looking at me)… and then says, “go to work”. Yes, the audacity!!! I mean, resignation (or the urge to do so) is a big deal!

We did have a serious discussion about it. Being the hub of rationale, he asked to write down all the pros and cons, and then finally concluded it is but a momentary feeling. I will be bored in no time, and will regret my decision. I had to agree. But I did wonder, how do you know if it’s time to call it quits? When is the right time to move on to another job, or leave the work force altogether? Before I say more, know that a credible study revealed that the average length of time millennials want to stay with a company is 4.7 years. So, no, don’t get ideas for the heck of it.
There are a number of reasons, however, that should definitely ring the alarm. Also, as Mr. N always insists, “never stop looking. You will either find something better or will at least be abreast market trends and what is being demanded by employers”.  That said, you must know why you want to quit/change jobs, and respective pros and cons. Do not get overly emotional – try being as rational as possible. Timeshared reasons why you should, and shouldn’t change employers. Here they are:

Top 4 Reasons Why You Should Change Employers:


You can move up faster and command a higher salary.Sometimes the best way to move up is to move out. In the Experience.com study, 54% believe that career advancement opportunities are more important than salary. The number one reason they are changing employers is because they aren’t advancing fast enough. In addition, millennials expect their average annual salary at their first job to be between $50,000 to $75,000, a sum few entry-level employees can command. It could take at least a year to get a raise because you have to wait for annual performance reviews.

You want to change careers altogether. If you decide that you want to go back to school to pursue an entirely different career, then it makes sense to quit your job if you’re financially able to. This is especially important if your company doesn’t have open positions in your new field because you won’t have a future there if you make the change.

Your relationship with your boss is toxic. If you and your manager don’t get along and you’ve tried everything possible to create a strong working relationship, then it might be time to leave. This can happen if they are untrustworthy, are taking credit for your hard work or just don’t show you any respect. Your manager has a major impact on your career success at work so if you can’t get along after an extended period of time, it’s going to hurt you.

Your life situation has changed. You could get married, have children, buy a house or want to start your own company. Your current salary and position at work might not support your life changes and aspirations any longer. For instance, your wife might have to move to a different state or country for work, and if you’re unable to do remote work, then you will be searching for a new job.

Top 4 Reasons Why you should stay with your employer:
 
You need to give your employer and job a chance. It can take about six months for you to go through training in a new job. If you depart after a year, you haven’t received much experience at all. If you don’t give yourself enough time at your job, you’ll never be trusted with more important projects that can help build your career.

It looks bad to switch jobs every year. Companies won’t invest in you if they know that you’re going to be a job hopper. They are looking for loyal employees who could become the next generation of leaders. Employers look down on resumes that depict job hopping for this very reason. ”Even in a focused search through recruiters I’m always looking to eliminate the job hopper,” says Mark Suster, a Partner at GRP Partners. “You’re probably disloyal. You don’t have staying power.”

It’s going to be very challenging finding a new job. Sometimes you just need to be happy with the job you have because so many people are unemployed. Many companies aren’t hiring now and the amount of time you spend job searching could be better utilized becoming a better and more valuable employee.

You will have to rebuild an internal network. When you work for a company for several years, you start to become well-known and highly connected there. You work with people in different departments, geographies, age brackets and positions. By formulating this network, you become more valuable and more productive. You learn about who inside your company can help you solve problems or accomplish projects. When you change employers, your network resets and you have to start investing time and energy in rebuilding it.
So, what is it going to be? Quit or stick around?

Shaheen Nouman

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